Rolling is Temporary

Do you roll out on a foam roll to loosen up your tight tissues only to find that everything is tight again the next day?  There is a very good (scientific) reason for that. A foam roller will never give enough pressure to break up scar tissue, adhesions, or trigger points, regardless of what someone […]

foam-roller

Do you roll out on a foam roll to loosen up your tight tissues only to find that everything is tight again the next day?  There is a very good (scientific) reason for that.

A foam roller will never give enough pressure to break up scar tissue, adhesions, or trigger points, regardless of what someone has told you in the past.

I’m not saying rolling out on a foam roller is bad for you, as it still has some good uses.

Foam rolling does a couple things for you.

  • It stimulates the fascial system in your body, which stimulates nerve endings in the fascia, allowing the muscles to relax temporarily.
  • If performed properly you can help mobilize your spine to loosen up the joints, especially in the upper back.

So, don’t spend 30 minutes rolling out on a foam roller, it is not worth the time.  And if you are planning on lifting heavy weights, you do not want to roll out first, as you want your muscles active to stabilize, not relaxed.

A good rule of thumb, roll out an area for 30 seconds, then actively use e area you just rolled out through its full range of motion, and then load it.  For example, if you roll out your hamstrings, follow it up by doing some active straight leg raises lying on your back, and then some light good mornings with an empty bar.

Want more information on why you always feel tight?  Need to learn you to roll out properly?  Think you need professional help to loosen things up?  Click here to schedule a FREE Discovery Session to find out what can be done to address your issues.

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